My Coding Origin Story

Earlier today Ben Halpern posted a bit about his coding origin story on dev.to. I thought it might be interesting to share how I got my start.

Growing my family was not an early computer adopter. Computers were expensive and my parents were endlessly frugal. So I don’t share the common origin story for a lot of nerds of my generation, I never noodled around with a Commodore 64 or anything of that era.

My first exposure to computer programming was writing simple routines in Logo on an Apple IIe in grade 6. Logo was very simple, but super valuable as a fundamental building block. My experience taught me the basics of looping and the idea of printing things to the screen and it certainly piqued my interest in programming at an early age.

The next code adjacent thing I remember doing was mucking around with the Windows 3.1 autoexec.bat file on my grandfather’s 386 laptop (which he had left with me for some reason), probably circa 1993. Pre-Internet I have no idea how I knew this was a file I could edit, what it did or what to do with it. Perhaps I read the MS-DOS help files. One thing I did learn quickly is that this file had the power to stop Windows from booting. And this actually taught me the important lesson of remaining calm in the face of utter, self-inflicted code disasters.

My coding memory is a huge one. It happened when my family finally got our first PC, a Compaq Presario 486, probably around 1994/95. Again, I don’t recall exactly how, but I soon discovered BBSes and door games. My favourite game by far was Legend of the Red Dragon (playable here). At this same time, I’d started to dive in to qBASIC. I poured through the source code of the demo programs and read through the included documentation. For some reason I decided to attempt to recreate a local version of LORD in qBASIC — except Star Trek: The Next Generation Themed (of course). I built an ASCII interface, ASCII procedural map generator, random encounters and a rudimentary combat system, a town with shops (armour, weapons and potions), system for tracking progress (goal, xp and levels) and that sort of thing. I retrospect, this seems like a monumental task, something I’d never even think to attempt now. With this experience, I had essentially taught myself all the fundamentals of programing I still use today: procedures, variables, control structures, logic, etc.

My first experience with HTML is probably a little more similar to other developers of my generator — Geocities and Netscape circa 1997. I distinctly remember the first website I built on geocities.com, a Star Wars: CCG “bad trader” list — basically a blacklist of people who’d screwed my friend Jon out of cards online — an HTML table on a repeating star background (groundbreaking stuff!). Having worked with the pre-written example programs source code that shipped with qBASIC years prior, the leap to view source on every single website came naturally. And by this time there were already well developed resources for learning HTML online.

I’m actually a little less certain about my introduction to PHP. I think it may have been Movable Type of my first domain (leggomyeggo.net).

Sprinkled here and there is some formal education and the rest — as they say — is history.

Leave a Reply